Tag Archives: TED

Savor Good Moments, Store the Memories

Savor good moments.

“Savor good moments” means have good moments and internalize them to make them part of you.  When you recognize joy, talk to yourself about it.  Feel it.  Express the wonder of the moment.  Express your gratitude for it.  Store it up inside of you.  Save it to offset the mundane times, the terrible times, the generally out-of-kilter times we all go through.  Doing this will help you be aware, whatever the times bring, of the joy you have within your reach.  When you savor good moments, you’ll have a buffer against bad times, and a generally more self-aware, positive outlook all the time.

To internalize a good moment – whether that represents a glance, a nod, holding your new puppy or newborn child, a walk down the aisle (to be recognized, to receive a diploma, to wed), an hour, a day, week or month – you have to have the experience and recognize it for what it is: a joyful moment.  To internalize that moment, let it wash through you so you are intensely aware of it.  Feel it fill you up.

Picture of a brain with a clapboard to illustrate Savor Good Moments, Store the Memories

Savor Good Moments, Store the Memories

Expressing your gratitude for these moments starts with self-expression.  Tell yourself how lucky you feel; how honored, how humbled, how awed, how energized the moment makes you feel.  Express that gratitude to others if it is appropriate.  Tell them how their role in the moment was a positive one.  Thank the Lord and/or the Universe for sharing the opportunity to realize that moment.

Store it up by letting it pass through you and fill you so thoroughly that you and the moment become one, and you know you are part of that moment and that moment is part of you.  When you make a practice of savoring and saving good moments, you’ll have a good foundation for weathering the storm of bad moments; the loss of a loved one, a job, a home, a relationship – losses are more bearable when you’ve a ready store of good moments that are part of you.

This has long been my philosophy, starting in my childhood.  This philosophy didn’t eliminate the misery of bad moments.  My store of good moments – my store of good – helps me remain positive, optimistic, and appreciative of simple, everyday moments and relationships. My store of good helped me weather the despair of the storms of life.  My store of good makes me ready to experience and savor more good moments.

I was reminded of this philosophy when I saw this TED Talk yesterday:

Hardwiring happiness: Dr. Rick Hanson

I was browsing TED Talks (one of my best Media Junkie habits) and found this one.
From the YouTube page:
Hardwiring Happiness : The Hidden Power of Everyday Experiences on the Modern Brain.  How to overcome the Brain’s Negativity Bias. Rick Hanson is a neuropsychologist and the author of Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence, best selling author of Buddha’s Brain, founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom and an Affiliate of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, he’s been an invited speaker at Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide.

Your comments are welcome.  So are your suggestions and questions.

Immigration Humanity in the United States of America

A healthy dose of immigration humanity is needed in the United States.
I just saw the best TED Talk I’ve seen in a while.  That’s saying something!
Juan Enriquez delivered a heartfelt plea for immigration humanity.

Immigration humanity at the US-Mexico border is not a partisan issue.  It is a human issue.

1.  the human race; human beings collectively.
         “appalling crimes against humanity”
Similar:
humankind, the human race, the human species, mankind, man, people, mortals, Homo Sapiens
Opposite:

the animal kingdom

          2.  humaneness; benevolence.
         “he praised them for their standards of humanity, care, and dignity”

Most (I would hope all) of the people I know would be sickened at the site of child abduction, regardless of their party or politics.

Please join me to introduce immigration humanity.  Contact your Federal Representatives.  https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials

Blockchain Defined – The Future Is Here

 

Blockchain :: how will this technology affect your business, your industry, and your life?

The last chapter of my book, WebForging, begins by saying, “The future is here.  The rest is coming fast.”   This TED Talk I viewed 10 minutes ago about Blockchain clearly illustrates my premise about the future.

The TED Description of this Talk says:

  What is the blockchain? If you don’t know, you should; if you do, chances are you still need some clarification on how it actually works. Don Tapscott is here to help, demystifying this world-changing, trust-building technology which, he says, represents nothing less than the second generation of the internet and holds the potential to transform money, business, government and society.

Picture of Blockchain Presenter

Don Tapscott

The presenter, Don Tapscott, wrote a book called The Blockchain Revolution.  Learn more about him at http://www.ted.com/speakers/don_tapscott

A bit of his bio from TED:

A leading analyst of innovation and the impacts of technology, Don Tapscott has authored or co-authored 15 books about various aspects of the reshaping of our society and economy. His work Wikinomics counts among the most influential business books of the last decade.

The Future is Here – Blockchain

As I say in WebForging, the best book to ground you in an understanding of the differences in production and economics between the physical and the virtual world is Being Digital, by Nicholas Negroponte.   Start there or jump straight into Blockchain to learn how your future will be impacted by technology.

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That’s it for today.  Getting ready for the Milwaukee River Cruise Tomorrow!  More info on that at https://www.meetup.com/wisconsin-business-owners/events/232089959/

 

An Injustice. Follow the Money.

An Injustice.  Follow the Money.

The American Experiment is alive, and not well.  At least not well if you’re a black man.

We are the greatest country in the world, in my not-so-humble opinion.  I believed in grade school, junior high and high school – and I believe to this day – that I’m blessed to live in the United States.  Opportunities abound.  Fairness may not always be the case, but it can usually be assumed.  Unless there’s a lot of money at stake.

Though anyone can, indeed, become President, we are not post-racial.  This TED talk does a great job of illustrating injustice.

In 1972, we had 300,000 people incarcerated in the US.  Today that number is 2,300,000.

The United States has 5% of the population; we have 25% of the world’s prison population.

Description from TED.com:

In an engaging and personal talk — with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks — human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America’s justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country’s black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America’s unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight and persuasiveness.


I started a new category with this post:  Follow the Money.  Rather than a generic ‘Politics’ category, Social and Follow the Money sum up a lot of observation on government.  I prefer talk about the issues include answers and helpful ideas, not just attacks on ideological opponents.  That, too, is an injustice.

Regards,
Keith